Feeds:
Posts
Comments

August 2012 Foliage and Bloom 065

Trees are a treasure in every capacity. From fruit to wood, foliage to flower, root to bark, we NEED trees for oxygen production as well as beauty in our lives. Not only do we need the trees, but also we find immense satisfaction in the choosing, viewing, designing, and general enjoyment of sitting under an old shade tree in the heat of summer.

There is an old saying “The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.” Trees are an investment in our future. They have stages of life just as we do; toddlers, teen, young adult, mature adult and geriatric. Rarely, do many of us get to enjoy a tree fully through its entire lifespan. However, for those of us who do, it is an invaluable experience. Warren Buffet said it so well, “Someone’s sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago.”

Trees can move you to tears in their beauty, bounty, and grace and to another person it is simply a green structure to be conquered because it is in our way. There are those who see people that love trees as ridiculous and small or they do not even notice the trees at all. However, to someone who takes the time to look up and see the beauty of Mother Natures amazing creation and all of the life it supports and provides us, it is a point of infinite imagination and creation. No person can diminish that level of awareness. “A fool sees not the same tree that a wise man sees.” -William Blake

This month the Designers Roundtable writes on the topic of “Celebrating the Trees.” With the diversity of our elite group of designers and writers, this month is sure to be one of the most powerful, poetic, dramatic and possibly humorous posts to date. So, make a date with the Lords and Ladies of the Roundtable to enjoy the tree. You might just come away with a completely new appreciation for all things wood.

Calculate the benefits that a tree in YOUR landscape provides with the National Tree Benefit Calculator from the Arbor Day Foundation. You’ll see the dollar value benefit in these categories: Storm water runoff, property value, energy conservation, air quality, and CO2 mitigation.

Enjoy,

Christina Salwitz

Follow the links below to see how our designers value Trees!

Jocelyn Chilvers : The Art Garden : Denver, CO

Lesley Hegarty & Robert Webber : Hegarty Webber Partnership : Bristol, UK

Debbie Roberts : A Garden of Possibilities : Stamford, CT

David Cristiani : The Desert Edge : Albuquerque, NM

Christina Salwitz : Personal Garden Coach : Renton, WA

Susan Cohan : Miss Rumphius’ Rules : Chatham, NJ

Scott Hokunson : Blue Heron Landscapes : Granby, CT

Douglas Owens-Pike : Energyscapes : Minneapolis, MN

Mary Gallagher Gray : Black Walnut Dispatch : Washington, D.C.

Transitions!

Change, conversion, evolution, passage, progress, transformation, turning point. It’s the moving between two spaces, the passage of time, and a change of perception. It’s transition, and its everyday life, and it’s extraordinary. The garden designer deals with transition on many levels, and today on the Roundtable we’ll see how are designers view and handle “Transitions”.

Please join us by clicking on the links below!

Jocelyn Chilvers : The Art Garden : Denver, CO

Deborah Silver : Dirt Simple : Detroit, MI

Scott Hokunson : Blue Heron Landscapes : Granby, CT

Mary Gallagher Gray : Black Walnut Dispatch : Washington, D.C.

Debbie Roberts : A Garden of Possibilities : Stamford, CT

David Cristiani : The Desert Edge : Albuquerque, NM

Jenny Peterson : J Petersen Garden Design : Austin, TX

Mistakes!

Mistakes, everyone makes them. From the brightest of minds to the most average of Joes, there is no escaping the fact that in the course of everyday life, or the pursuit of greatness, they will happen.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
― Albert Einstein

Bloopers, blunders, flubs, gaffes, missteps, omissions, snafus, or even teaching lessons, they’re called by many names. Never take for granted however, the opportunity to err and learn, and pity those who do not enjoy the privilege.

Freedom is not worth having if it does not include the freedom to make mistakes.
― Mahatma Gandhi

And in those moments when all seems hopeless, and frustration and embarrassment abound, remember that:

As long as the world is turning and spinning, we’re gonna be dizzy and we’re gonna make mistakes.
― Mel Brooks

Our designers make mistakes too, and today pull back the veil and reveal their lessons learned. Please join us as we discuss “mistakes”, garden style!

Follow the links below and when you’re done reading, stop by our Facebook Page and tell us about your favorite learning experiences.

Mary Gallagher Gray : Black Walnut Dispatch : Washington, D.C.

Debbie Roberts : A Garden of Possibilities : Stamford, CT

Deborah Silver : Dirt Simple : Detroit, MI

Romance!

Giverny

Claude Monet’s Garden at Giverny
Photo credit: Lesley Hegarty

One of the many great things about these Round Table group posts is that you never know what people are going to write about. Oh sure, we are all writing about the same topic, but fortunately no one person’s view is ever the same as another’s!

Take romance in gardens. Well, what is ‘a romantic garden’ anyway?

Is it a bucolic reverie of the past, a cottage garden idyll, or a more rugged and ruinous landscape with an ancient abbey perched on a wooded knoll half concealed in the mist?

Might it be one of those recognized staples such as the Taj Mahal with its fabulous love story, Monet’s pictorial garden at Giverny, The Alhambra or Ninfa?

Or if we are thinking in terms of garden history, will someone be writing an erudite dissertation on precisely which garden indicated the true start of the so called ‘Romantic Movement’ in gardens?

We are a very planterly group so surely someone will write about plants which excite the senses: all billowing blossoms, velvety textures and seductive scents. Queue lavender and roses, honeysuckle and azaleas, not to mention lilies and cherry pie.

Or perhaps one of us will get down to brass tacks and discuss how to dress a garden specifically for romance. Here we are clearly thinking sheltering arbours, tinkling fountains, aquamarine plunge pools and secretive screens for privacy.

You see, the possibilities are limitless!

Enough speculation. Lets find out what they all said!

Robert Webber and Lesley Hegarty

Lesley Hegarty & Robert Webber : Hegarty Webber Partnership : Bristol, UK

David Cristiani : The Desert Edge : Albuquerque, NM

Debbie Roberts : A Garden of Possibilities : Stamford, CT

Deborah Silver : Dirt Simple : Detroit, MI

Jocelyn Chilvers : The Art Garden : Denver, CO

Mary Gallagher Gray : Black Walnut Dispatch : Washington, D.C.

Inspiration!

The most valiant thing you can do as an artist is inspire someone else to be creative. 

~ Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creativity is borne from the everyday experiences that inspire us, and without inspiration, creativity cannot survive. An artist looks to his medium and waits for the innate masterpiece to reveal itself. Whether the  medium is canvas or paper, steel or stone, or eve if  it is performance, the artist looks to reveal that which is hidden and then to inspire. So too does the garden designer, as artist, reveal the innate beauty of a space and inspire. Today on Garden Designers Roundtable, we look to discover the extraordinary from the ordinary, the magic from the mundane, to find innate, we look to reveal and to inspire!

Take a tour with our designers as they discuss the experiences that inspire them, and the creativity borne from those experiences!

Susan Cohan : Miss Rumphius’ Rules : Chatham, NJ

Scott Hokunson : Blue Heron Landscapes : Granby, CT

Lesley Hegarty & Robert Webber : Hegarty Webber Partnership : Bristol, UK

Jocelyn Chilvers : The Art Garden : Denver, CO

Jenny Peterson : J Petersen Garden Design : Austin, TX

Douglas Owens-Pike : Energyscapes : Minneapolis, MN

Deborah Silver : Dirt Simple : Detroit, MI

Christina Salwitz : Personal Garden Coach : Renton, WA

Cheap & Chic

A re-purposed weather vane This month on Garden Designers Roundtable, we explore the topic Cheap & Chic.

Your landscape is an investment in your home’s long-term value, but let’s face it, gardening can be an expensive obsession.

Our designers share tried and true ways to update your garden and put your personal stamp on it. Ways to have the garden of your dreams without breaking the bank.

Perhaps it’s growing your own food with style, reducing maintenance costs, creating your own garden accessories, or growing your own bouquets. From upcycling to recycling and repurposing, there are lots of creative and imaginative ways to get inspired and have a dream garden that is also Cheap & Chic.

Follow the links below to discover how to create a garden that fits your lifestyle, looks great, doesn’t cost a fortune and is Cheap & Chic:

Lesley Hegarty & Robert Webber : Hegarty Webber Partnership : Bristol, UK

Susan Cohan : Miss Rumphius’ Rules : Chatham, NJ

Andrew Keys : Garden Smackdown : Boston, MA

Deborah Silver : Dirt Simple : Detroit, MI

Rochelle Greayer : Studio ‘g’ : Boston, MA

Plants and Memory!

‘Plants and Memory’? What kind of topic is that, I hear you wondering? Ah, but it’s a good one—just you wait.

Plants and Memory

At some point in the GDRT, you’ve probably heard us discuss the concept of terroir, which Wikipedia defines as “the special characteristics that the geography, geology and climate of a certain place, interacting with the plant’s genetics, expressed in agricultural products such as wine, coffee, chocolate, tomatoes, heritage wheat and tea.”

I’ve always thought terroir extends to places themselves, and people. All the tiny details that make up a place—many imperceptible, many taken for granted—those details are what make a place what it is, and through the meaningful places in our lives, they’re part of what make us who we are.

Plants, for a lot of people, get lost in those details. Maybe that’s why you find yourself so sentimental over those lilacs and peonies that grew where you grew up, even though you hadn’t really thought about it for years and now you live in Florida. Personally, I find people’s sentimental connection to plants so fascinating, I went so far as to write a book about that connection, and how to choose plants that scratch that same sentimental itch that work where you live. It’s called Why Grow That When You Can Grow This?: 255 Extraordinary Alternatives to Everyday Problem Plants. See what else I and my comrades have to say about “Plants and Memory” today’s Garden Designers Roundtable:

Andrew Keys : Garden Smackdown : Boston, MA

Deborah Silver : Dirt Simple : Detroit, MI

Genevieve Schmidt : North Coast Gardening : Arcata, CA

Jocelyn Chilvers : The Art Garden : Denver, CO

Lesley Hegarty & Robert Webber : Hegarty Webber Partnership : Bristol, UK

Mary Gallagher Gray : Black Walnut Dispatch : Washington, D.C.

Rebecca Sweet : Gossip In The Garden : Los Altos, CA

Susan Cohan : Miss Rumphius’ Rules : Chatham, NJ

Susan Morrison : Blue Planet Garden Blog : East Bay, CA

Thomas Rainer : Grounded Design : Washington, D.C.

Rochelle Greayer : Studio ‘g’ : Boston, MA

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 308 other followers